The Matrix Has Me. Part One.

March 4, 2011

After reading some posts on babelhut.com and reading how Peter was transcribing Fight Club (here) dubbed in Japanese I decided to transcribe some more Matrix. I know I already transcribed the part where Morpheus explains the Matrix to Neo, but this time I went back to chapter 6 of the movie. In this chapter Neo is caught by the Agents for the first time and is asked by Agent Smith to help them bring Morpheus to justice.

So below is the transcript, with audio for each part and I will explain about some words and phrases that I thought interesting. I will not put anything into furigana or romaji.

S:この通り、我々かなり以前から君に目を付けてたアンダーソン君。Audio
–Lit. translation: As you can see, we had our eyes on you since some time ago, Mr. Anderson.
—-Note: Agent Smith refers to Thomas Anderson with the “kun” suffix. It is endearing and at the same time shows Smith thinks he is superior to him.

S:どうやら君は二つの顔を持って。一つは一流ソフトウエアメイカーのプログラマーであるトマス・エイ・アンダーソンだ。社会保障番号もあれば納税もしてる。それに大家の塵をかわりにに出してやったりもする。Audio
–Lit Translation: It appears that you have two faces (that you live two lives). The first is Thomas A. Anderson, a programmer for a top-tier software maker. You have a social security number and pay your taxes. Furthermore you take the garbage out for your landlady.
—-Note: Pretty standard stuff here but I wasn’t familiar with the words, “Social Security” and “Taxes.” But they are pretty important I think so those go into the SRS. Also don’t you like the Kanji for “gomi?” ゴミ/塵

S:もう一つは裏の世界の顔だ。それは通称「ネオ」と呼ばれるハッカーでありとあらゆるコンピューター犯罪に手を染めるもう一人の君だ。Audio
–Lit Translation: The other is a face of the underworld. A hacker using the alias “Neo” that has had his hand in every possible computer crime.

S:前者には未来があるが後者にはない。私も出来るだけ率直に話そうと思うアンダーソン君。協力をしてもらうために来てもらった。Audio
–Lit. Translation: The former has a future, the latter does not.  I would like to talk with you as forthcoming as possible, Mr. Anderson. I have brought you here because I need your cooperation.
—-Notes: 前者and後者, are interesting words, I think they are very useful so those will go into my SRS. 率直 is also interesting. I already knew of 素直 which has more or less the same meaning. But sunao can also have the meaning of being “meek,” or “docile,” so socchoku fits better in this situation.

S:君がある人物から接触を受けてるのは分かってる。自らモーフィアスと名乗る男だ。君が奴をどう思っていようと誤りだな。現在モーフィアスは当局からもっとも危険な人物と見做されている。Audio
–Lit. Translation: We know that you have been contacted by a certain individual. A man who calls himself “Morpheus.” Whatever you think you know about this man is a mistake on your part. He is considered by many authorities to be the most dangerous man today.
—-Notes: The Japanese in this section is a translation of the English script almost word for word. The word 接触–sesshoku–interested me a bit. It means “touch, or contact.” Both Kanji in this word mean the same individually. It made me think of how this word is used in English and it really does have a pretty deep meaning. A phrase like “We’ll keep in touch / contact.” is used everyday but it has nothing to do with it’s original meaning. Sorry this is one of my “fascinated with languages” moments, I’ll call them FWLM. Don’t you like when your L2 or L3 makes you think about how the history of words in your L1?

Let’s talk about 誤り –ayamari– now. This words is hard to translate, I don’t really see how this fits into this sentence at all given the definition of it is: “error, mistake, slip, bug.” The English script says “ Whatever you think you know about this man is irrelevant.” And there really isn’t a word for “irrelevant” in  Japanese so I guess a word meaning, “error, or mistake” had to be used instead, correct me if I am wrong.

S:同僚は君を説得しても無駄だと言ってるが、私は君の良心を信じているんだ。君の汚れた過去を清算しよう。まだやり直せる。そのかわり、君は我々に協力してそのテロリストに法網裁きを下す手伝いをする。Audio

–Lit. Translation: My colleagues tell me that it is useless to try and persuade you. But I believe in your conscience. Let’s liquidate this dirty past of yours. You can still start fresh. In return, we would like your cooperation to help up bring this terrorist to justice.

—-Note:Words of note would be 説得–settoku–,良心–ryoushin–, 清算–seisan–,  寶網–houmou–、and 裁き–sabaki–. The most interesting of them is houmou I think. I like this word cause it’s literal, the Kanji mean “Law, and net” the meaning is “justice.” Sabaki means “judgement.” So the phrase 寶網裁きを下す means “To have judgement passed by the net of the law.” Or as the English says “bring to justice.”

N:ああ、かなりいい取引のようだな。だが協力するよりこれはどうかな。。。きっとすっきりするぜ。Audio
–Lit Translation: Yeah, that sounds like a really good deal. But rather than cooperating how about this…i’ll spell it out plainly for you. (He gives the finger)

—-Note: I’m assuming the middle finger doesn’t mean anything in the Japanese culture, but they know what it means. But the phrase きとすっきりするぜ –kitto sukkiri suru ze– isn’t something you hear often, loosely translated it means “(Let me do this and) My answer should be clear to you.”

S:ウム。。
—Translation: *grumble*

N:俺に電話をかけさせるんだい。Audio
–Lit Translation: how about giving me my phone call.

S:そうかアンダーソン君、がっかりしたよ。Audio
–Lit. Translation: Mr. Anderson, I’m disappointed.
—-Note: がっかり–gakkari– is a 擬態語–gitaigo– a mimetic word for something that has no sound. You use gakkari when something doesn’t go the way you planned. Did you have any gakkari moments today?

N:ゲシタポみたいな真似をして脅すのは止めよ。俺には権利がある。電話をかけさせるんだ。Audio
–Lit Translation: Stop threatening me with the Gestapo act. I have rights. Let me have a phone call.

S:だがアンダーソン君。喋れないとなると電話は何かの役に立つかな。Audio
–Lit. Translation: But Mr. Anderson, what good is a phone call if you have become unable to speak.

—-Note: You should use the Kanji for shaberu as much as possible, cause Kanji is cool.

S:君は我々に協力する。抵抗しても無駄だ。Audio
–Lit. Translation: You will cooperate with us. Resistance is futile.

—-Note: Yeah I know “Resistance is futile” is from Star Trek or something but that’s what it says, or at least that is one interpretation.

Chapter 6 Run time – About 3 minutes.

This actually took a long time to do, more than 2 hours if I went through it straight, but I just did bit by bit throughout the day. Probably won’t do the whole thing next time just noteworthy sentences.

Advertisements

3 Responses to “The Matrix Has Me. Part One.”

  1. Lan'dorien Says:

    Interesting. What do you feel the benefit is of doing transcriptions?

    • nekesu04 Says:

      I believe transcribing helps with listening skills and even writing skills (speed and accuracy). Listening to something and trying to write it down word for word (with Kanji if you’re feeling bold) can be a real test of your skills. If you like the material enough you’ll have no problem watching or listening to it over and over and eventually the words you didn’t know just stick, sometimes even if you didn’t put them into your SRS. Now I have only done a couple of these, along with some Japanese TV eps I have done in the past, and it’s a time-consuming process; but I will let you know if I reap any benefits from this. Putting “fun” stuff into my SRS certainly didn’t help me pass the JLPT 2 (I didn’t,) so I am going back to the Core 6000 and running through those. Thanks for your comment!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: